Seems like all my good ideas are rather labor-intensive.

I get it though.

When we first walked up to this house, and I saw it perched on a little hill with its imposing three stories… I knew it.

When we first walked into this house, and I saw those thick walls on the back of the house that were part of the envelope… I knew it.

I knew this hideous, monster of a 1980s time capsule could be my palette. That third story said ‘cozy attic bedrooms’ and those thick, weird envelope walls said ‘thick stone deep set windowsills’. And so I set out, (dragging hubs along with me:) to create the Frenchiest farmhouse this side of the Atlantic. That was 6 years ago and all this time I’ve poured over coffee table books for inspiration.

Then two years ago I visited Giverny for the first time. The magical gardens of Monet had already been a source of inspiration via my numerous books on his gardens (which is why they are primarily in the FRONT of my house as opposed to the back) but I had never really paid much attention to his house, aside from enjoying the photographs in my cherished (out of print) Monet’s cookbook.

But when I walked into that kitchen of his for the first time – well, it may not sound very French of me to say, but it was on like Donkey Kong.

I already had it in mind to paint some tile for our kitchen and I was going to go in the Delft direction because of how much I LOVE Delft tile and I’ve done it many times before… but then I saw that tile of his en masse… hundreds and hundreds of them with the brilliant copper pots and pans… and it took my breath away.

I had to do it.

Monet’s kitchen has a variety of tiles, but I decided to focus on his, well, let’s call it his fleur-de-lis star pattern, and about a year ago I began to paint.

I tinkered with the tile, painting a few here and a few there, and then after one of my Paris tours last year I decided to shift things into gear and I’ve painted them whenever I could find a spare moment (which isn’t often). Each tile takes about 20 minutes and I have about 97 done so far.

I’ll spare you the brain cramp – that’s about 33 hours of painting.

I’m using glass paint (you can watch more about my process here) and after they’ve sat for three days, I ‘fire’ them in my oven as per the directions on the glass paint bottle.

Well – The other day I got an idea that I needed some GRATIFICATION. I probably have another year of painting ahead of me, but with all this kitchen rehab I needed to feel the satisfaction of enjoying what I’ve done so far, and low and behold, I measured the space above Luga, and I have ENOUGH!

There’s been some ups and downs, but I finally landed on a design to frame it out and I’m pretty jazzed to have this first step done! NOW – back to the floors and picking a wall color for our Frenchiest Farmhouse kitchen this side of the Atlantic:)

I love these ladies! It’s been almost a year and yet we still chat via text every day!

Monet’s house is a highlight for my guests on our Paris Flea Market trips – Arriving to that house for the first time LITERALLY takes your breath away. Let me take you to this magical place this October. I’ve got three spaces left, perhaps one has your name on it?

Click here to reserve your spot for our October trip.

I’m for SURE not done blabbing about this tile project, but I had to share this bit of success with you. Everything is so messy and chaotic right now, I can’t tell you how good it feels to create something gorgeous…

So, I hope you enjoy today’s video – as usual I end up in my pajamas working after the kids go to bed – (aren’t they fabulous?)

I had to share with you how it’s going, and then on Friday watch for the most epic “Director’s Cut” we’ve ever done to see ALLLLLLL the nitty gritty that went into this project AND the end result. Hint: it’s breathtaking even if it does make the walls look even grosser than they did before! Soon to be remedied! Will I go with Monet yellow?

Stay tuned.

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