A couple weeks ago the littlest Nada Farm Girl generously sent my Amélie a package and to her surprise she opened a darling pair of pale pink ballet slippers.   She is so proud of them.  They are a couple sizes to big but the gaps along the sides and the elastic pressing into her still chubby feet is so precious…

As mother’s we shape our children.  We prepare them for their adult lives.
As a mother I constantly tell my children there is nothing they can do that would make me happier than for them to love Jesus.  It’s up to me to create those habits that will soften their heart to Him.

John & Charles Wesley’s mother Susanna had 19 children.
 NINETEEN.
She spent one hour a week with each of her children reading the word of God to/with them.
ONE HOUR A WEEK.  PER CHILD.
Here are her own words:
“I am a woman, but I am also the mistress of a large family. And though the superior charge of the souls contained in it lies upon you, yet in your long absence I cannot but look upon every soul you leave under my charge as a talent committed to me under a trust. I am not a man nor a minister, yet as a mother and a mistress I felt I ought to do more than I had yet done. I resolved to begin with my own children; in which I observe, the following method: I take such a proportion of time as I can spare every night to discourse with each child apart. On Monday I talk with Molly, on Tuesday with Hetty, Wednesday with Nancy, Thursday with Jacky, Friday with Patty, Saturday with Charles.”


Two of her sons would go on to shape the spiritual nature of two nations.
Simply stated, John Wesley founded the English methodist movement, using open air preaching much like the great George Whitefield.  Charles Wesley went on to America to do the same… both encouraging people to experience Jesus personally.


And then there’s me.  Out here in the suburbs of Chicago.  Wondering if I can be used shape hearts and souls in such a way…
The other day Amélie and I were having “our time” on the couch.  We were reading Proverbs 31, we were breaking it down, thinking of ways Amélie could be like the woman in the passage when I hugged her and said passionately,
 “Oh LeeLee, Momma wants you to be a Godly Woman someday.”
to which she replied with her usual sassy spunk,


“I no wanna be a Godly Woman, I wanna be a Ballerina!”